The New York Times Reviews MomoFuku Ssam Bar

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Frank Bruni, the somewhat controversial New York Times food critic, has given a somewhat decent review of David Chang’s new restaurant, Momofuku Ssam Bar.

Significance?

Well, it’s a bit of a Korean themed restaurant that is getting some buzz in New York. Chang himself is of Korean descent, and the word ssam is Korean for “wrap.”

In fact, I’ve read somewhere that they have a good bossam “off the menu” if you ask for it politely ahead of time. A pork feast for twelve.

Am I being too optimistically paranoid that Korean food is becoming a bigger deal in New York?

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5 thoughts on “The New York Times Reviews MomoFuku Ssam Bar”

  1. I confess, I do love Krispy Kreme. Maybe it’s just nostalgia. I only like them hot. I don’t think I would wait so long for them, though.

    I’ve noticed the sweet-western-food thing too, like the potato salad banchan. What’s up with that?

    Reply
  2. Yeah, I forgot about that. But I do like it when Korean pear is mixed with the potato salad.

    The banchan that irks me most, even though I sometimes eat it, is shredded hard cabbage with drizzles of ketchup and mayonnaise on it.

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  3. Wow,this is such an interesting article. I didnt know about the Korean sweet tooth! AND, I can not imagine KK being more sweet. Is that possible? Hugs from Panama 🙂

    Reply
  4. Krispy Kremes are so wonderful~ I could actually eat an entire box if they didnt have 200 calories and 12 grams of fat per doughnut. sigh. I heard that the Korean population is getting heavier on average and so teachers are giving out exercise as homework… perhaps the popularity of doughnuts has something to do with it. I must say that Koreans do take particular care in the aesthetics of their fast food. I was so excited about the heart shaped doughnuts with pretty pink sprinkles at the Dunkin Doughnuts in Korea.
    hmmm… I always thought the potato salad banchan and the cabbage salad banchan were more of a fondness for mayonnaise thing, which also happens to be in the bakery pizza and even in the wasabi sauces?

    Reply

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