Dalk Doritang (닭도리탕)

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Ah, the first official food porn entry.

The thing is, it just looks pretty. I don’t know anything about this food’s history or — anything. I just ordered it one day because it was something I hadn’t tried yet.

Dalk Doritang is basically a spicy chicken soup. Yet it pulls off a sort of creaminess without the use of any dairy products. This is a perfect warm-me-up for a chilly Korean Peninsula winter day.

The “dalk” means “chicken.” “Tang” means “soup.” Don’t know what the “dori” means. Eun Jeong’s watching Jumong right now. I don’t want to bother her.

Trust me. Don’t bother her during Jumong.

This creamy spicy soup is loaded with leeks, mushrooms, and big hunks o’ chicken. As with most Korean foods, white shirts are discouraged.

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12 thoughts on “Dalk Doritang (닭도리탕)”

  1. Wow, thanks Warren!

    Yeah, Jjim Dalk is a good classic dish. Very much a heavy winter food, in my opinion. One time, Eun Jeong was craving it during a hot August day.

    BAD DECISION.

    Jjim Dalk, though, has been a good dish to introduce visitors and newbies to.

    Reply
  2. This dish is especially delicious in the central south korea. If you visit a place like Haeinsa around Daegu, you will find restaurants overflowing with the spicy goodness. I’ve been told by some Koreans that Dalkdoritang can also be called Dalkbokeum (Mixed Chicken Pan Cooked)in this sense, when prepared, it is similar to a Jjim Dalk (steamed spicy chicken with little sauce, also a specialty of Central South Korea). Usually both dishes, when prepared well, are less like a soup, and more like a thick stew, served on an open plate, or in a low walled ceramic dish atop a burner. The Jjimdalk contains Soy Sauce, while Dalkdoritang does not. Mmm. Warren.

    Reply
  3. New York Times에서 기사를 읽다가 링크를 통해 왔습니다. ‘zen김치’라고 되어있어서 그냥 눌러봤지요.
    덕분에 배만 많이 고파졌어요 🙂

    Reply
  4. to go along with anonymous, the reason why dak dori tang has dori in it is because due to the japanese colonialization of korea alot of japanese words were infused with the korean language and thus certain names and titles have japanese influences and likewise in japan where korean and chinese and even english is incorporated to their language.

    Reply
  5. Yeah, Dak dori tang is one of my favorite Korean dishes. I have fond memories growing up in korea when we would take a family trip south (perhaps around Daegu like Warren mentioned) where they’d have these…inn/restaurant type places with a chicken farm in the back. You pick the chicken you want and an hour later you get delicious dak dori tang. Now THAT’s the way to appreciate food.

    Reply
  6. Okay, I found one. It’s from _Authentic Recipes in Korea_ by Injoo Chun, Jaewoon Lee, and Youngran Baek.

    INGREDIENTS
    1 small Chicken, cut into bite-sized chunks
    2 cubs (500 ml) Water
    4 small Potatoes, quartered
    1 large Carrot, halved lengthwise, then cut into chunks
    3 dried Red Dates
    2 medium Onions, thickly sliced
    1 large Leek, white part only, thinly sliced
    2 green or red Chiles, sliced diagonally and deseeded
    2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
    Sesame Seeds, to garnish

    MARINADE
    1/4 cub (60 ml) Soy Sauce
    2 Tablespoons Gochujang (red pepper paste)
    2-3 teaspoons Gachugaru (ground red pepper)

    1. Heat a nonstick wok over medium heat and dry-fry the chicken pieces for 2 minutes. Set aside.

    2. Place the ingredients for the Marinade in a medium-sized bowl and mix. Add the chicken, mix well and leave for 5 minutes.

    3. In a large pot, add the chicken, Marinade and water, and bring to a boil. Cover, then reduce the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the potatoes, carrot and dried red dates, and simmer for 20 minutes until tender, stirring several times.

    4. Add the onions, leek, and chilies, and simmer for 5 minutes. Drizzle the stew with the sesame oil, stir and remove from heat. Serve garnished with the sesame seeds.

    Reply
  7. I recently visited Daegu and had some Jjimdalk, it was some of the most wonderful stuff ever. Do you happen to have a recipe for that as well? Thank you.

    Reply

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