Re: Michael Hurt

4719905278 1e2cbb675911 Re: Michael Hurt

I’m posting about this because he said it was cool.

It hasn’t been announced much publicly on the K-blogosphere. Stalwart of the Korean bloggers, one of my mentors, and one of the pioneers of Korean street fashion photography, Michael Hurt (Yahae, Feetman Seoul, Metropolitician), suffered a stroke earlier this month after returning from a trip to America. It was a few days before he was discovered and taken to the hospital.

Talking to his mother, she said it may have been ironically a good thing that it took a while because it gave time for the blood to dissipate and be absorbed by his brain, so no surgery was necessary.

He only recently became awake enough to accept visitors, so I stopped by last night. He’s looking pretty darn good for someone who has been through what he’s been through. All his mental capacities are lucid and sharp. The left side of his face is not all there yet, resulting in a Billy Idol sneer when he talks. He also has very limited control of the left side of his body, but all the feeling is there.

Another big change is that his brother shaved his head. He’s looking a bit monastic now.

Mike’s mother is Korean and works in the cardiology section of a hospital in the U.S. But she’s admitted that being in a Korean hospital has been a bit of a culture shock. She has to go buy supplies that American hospitals usually have available in the rooms, like rubber gloves. Patients in Korean hospitals don’t really get much care. The families supply the meals. There’s little, if any, concept of bedside manner. And the lack of communication is astounding.

For example, they had trouble tapping a vein to get some blood. So a doctor set up a tap so that hospital workers could easily get blood when needed. That didn’t stop some person at 4 a.m. from sticking his foot to try to get more blood.

The positive side of the Korean hospital is the communal nature of it. Mike’s in a room with around seven other stroke patients. Their families are there too. When a patient gets up to walk or does some skill for the first time, the entire room breaks out into applause. The families share food. I was privileged enough to help Mike down his first piece of fried chicken since his stroke. Yes, I know that it’s not the healthiest of foods, but sometimes a little happy helps the healing. Some of the other families helped fashion a rope at the foot of his bed to help him sit up. And as I was leaving, some of the ladies were joining his mother in slapping and massaging Mike’s back.

Mike’s gonna have to return to the States indefinitely to recover. The doctors are positive about his recovery. But, of course, there will have to be a lot of changes. In the meantime, we’re looking for a home for his two very sweet and docile cats.

GD Star Rating
a WordPress rating system

ZenKimchi

Author: ZenKimchi

Joe McPherson founded ZenKimchi in 2004. He has been featured and sourced in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, CNN, KBS, MBC, SBS, Le Figaro, Travel + Leisure Southeast Asia, Harper’s Bazaar Korea, The Chosun Weekly, and other Korean and international media. He has consulted for The Travel Channel’s “Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern,” Lonely Planet, and the PBS documentary series “Kimchi Chronicles.” Mr. McPherson has written for multiple Korean and international publications, including SEOUL Magazine, JoongAng Daily, The Korea Herald, Newsweek Korea and wrote the feature article for U.S. National publication Plate magazine’s all-Korean food issue. He has acted as dining editor for 10 Magazine and was on the judging panel for Korea for the Miele Guide. He spoke at TEDx Seoul on Korean food globalization, at TED Worldwide Talent Search on the rise of Korean cuisine, and in New York City on Korean Buddhist temple cuisine. The company ZenKimchi International organizes food tours for tourists and corporations and acts as a media liaison for foreign and Korean media and local restaurants and producers.

Share This Post On

8 Comments

  1. Glad to see he is doing well, but sad to hear he is returning to the states ><

    Post a Reply
  2. Just keep a camera in his hands when he goes for the unhealthy stuff! Channel that hunger into art! Good luck and come back fighting, Mike!

    Post a Reply
  3. Just got back from the hospital where Mike is doing 1000% better than when I last saw him on Saturday.He dictated a list of DVDs he wants me to bring him along with his laptop. So very encouraging all round, despite a long road to go yet!

    Post a Reply
  4. Holy crap! Mike, if you’re reading this, my prayers go out to you for a speedy and thorough recovery. 

    Post a Reply
  5. Mike if you read this, my heart goes out to you. I wish you all the best and a speedy recovery. I would also like to second the notion of helping out with the magazine or anything. I have been reading your work for a long time. Get well soon. 

    Post a Reply
  6. Best wishes to Mike.
    BTW, did you really give fried chicken to a stroke victim in the hospital?

    Post a Reply
    • Eun Jeong Lee

      The family of the patient next to him insisted he have some of theirs.

      Post a Reply

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title="" rel=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>