ZenKimchi

Author: ZenKimchi

Joe McPherson founded ZenKimchi in 2004. He has been featured and sourced in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, CNN, KBS, MBC, SBS, Le Figaro, Travel + Leisure Southeast Asia, Harper’s Bazaar Korea, The Chosun Weekly, and other Korean and international media. He has consulted for The Travel Channel’s “Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern,” Lonely Planet, and the PBS documentary series “Kimchi Chronicles.” Mr. McPherson has written for multiple Korean and international publications, including SEOUL Magazine, JoongAng Daily, The Korea Herald, Newsweek Korea and wrote the feature article for U.S. National publication Plate magazine’s all-Korean food issue. He has acted as dining editor for 10 Magazine and was on the judging panel for Korea for the Miele Guide. He spoke at TEDx Seoul on Korean food globalization, at TED Worldwide Talent Search on the rise of Korean cuisine, and in New York City on Korean Buddhist temple cuisine. The company ZenKimchi International organizes food tours for tourists and corporations and acts as a media liaison for foreign and Korean media and local restaurants and producers.

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  • http://wiki.galbijim.com/Main_Page mithridates

    Well, this is a surprise, congrats. Now if only I was interested in food (I eat maybe twice a day and a litre of milk is breakfast).

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ ZenKimchi

    Jun, Rachel, Anon, Mark, Mith, and Sue… Thank you so much. It feels like my birthday today (which is Feb. 27th, if anyone is curious).

    Rachel, I don’t think Julia, the writer of the story, knew my Southern or fried chicken background when she called me. You could hear the lights flashing in her head when I told her.

    Funny how that works!

    Sue, NAVER?? Man, I was hoping to get some Naverites here to tell me I knew nothing (which I already knew). Seriously, I hope the article did more to enhance Korea’s image in the culinary world.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ ZenKimchi

    Tuscon Anon,

    If I was back in the States, I would be working right away to start a Korean chicken joint. That would catch on so quickly there–the same as Krispy Kreme caught on here (another prediction of mine).

  • Anonymous

    And wonderfully so! Congrats on the good press – well deserved! Kudos, Joe

  • mark

    Congrats!

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ ZenKimchi

    Protected Static,

    I’ve been able to mimic the Two-Two flavors and the sauce. I’ll make it again and post the recipe.

  • http://mykoreankitchen.com sue

    Congratulations! I also read a brief Korean version of it on Naver too. Though it only mentioned your name without your blog URL, but most importantly you are on the front page of New York Times. Well done :)

  • Anonymous

    Saw your blog through the NYT link. Congrats! I’m stuck in Tucson, Arizona, which has great Mexican food and that’s it has made me incredibly homesick for something spicy and fried, like Cajun, Korean, anything…. Your blog is great. Thanks for writing it. Now, if Another Flying Chicken wants to open an outpost, I’d be heading the line every day.

  • Gdog

    Nice article, you’ve hit the big time, Joe! Just a tidbit for the other readers, I was also contacted for an interview but she never called me. Oh well, let’s give it up to ZenKimchi!

  • http://www.protectedstatic.com/ protected static

    While there’s a sizeable Korean community here in the Seattle area, I don’t think that there’re any Korean-style fried chicken joints – so my big disappointment is the lack of any recipes to go with the article. The combination of spicy fried chicken, pickles, and soju sounds quite delicious…

  • Cho-Yau
  • jerry
  • Anonymous

    or cho-yau:
    Bon-chon chiken (3 found)

    mahattan 32 shop 212-221-2222
    314 5th Ave 2nd Floor. New York.

    manhattan tribeca shop 212-227-2375
    98 chamber ST. NEW YORK

    Flushing shop 718-321-3818
    157-18 northern Blvd. Flushing NY

    For Jerry:
    UFC
    71-22 Roosevelt Ave., Jackson Heights
    718-205-6662

  • http://seoullife.net Cat

    Hey, Joe!

    Congrats! The story is awesome! Did the reporter say she read your earlier post about fried chicken? I think you did a better job of explaining how they cook it, actually.
    Great work.

  • http://www.protectedstatic.com/ protected static

    Ooh, that would be great! Thanks!

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ ZenKimchi

    Hanna, wow, thanks for the ego boost. I’ll try to let it get to my head.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ ZenKimchi

    Pepero,

    So true. As crazy as Korea can get, it gets in your blood. It’s like taking a bath in ice water. Wakes you up.

  • Hanna

    hello—i’m a totally random stranger who happened to click on the newyorktimes article for your zenkimchi website. i’m very impressed by your descriptions, pictures, and enthusiasm for food. more than just the typical blathering about a person’s day, you really did a good job of incorporating a western’s introduction to korea with its most familiar cultural ambassador, native food.

  • http://zenkimchi.com/ ZenKimchi

    I always thought “odeng” sounded Japanese. Eun Jeong always says “오댕.” I’ll go change that. Thanks.

  • Julia

    Yay Joe! I’ve posted the link to the NYT article all over MySpace and am showing it off at work today. I’m so proud of you! My celebrity brother!

  • pepero

    so glad I read the NYTimes :) I’m a recovering English teacher (2 years in seoul) living in Canada again, and man do I miss the food! I’m happy to find a blog where I can reminisce and talk with other dokbokki aficionados. mm, dokbokki… I miss drunken to-se-te consumption at three in the morning..

  • Se-Won

    You should write Eomook(어묵) instead of odeng(오뎅) because it’s japaneese language. ^^;

  • http://maryeats.com/ maryeats

    joe AMAZING! I am so happy for you. Finally, a little bit of the Korean bloggers in the big world of food blogging celebrity!w

  • Dan
  • Dan

    A different kind of chicken

    不一樣的雞肉

    Thursday, Feb 15, 2007,Page 17

    A South Korean restaurant owner prepares chickens for sale in Seoul, Jan. 20, 2007.
    2007年1月20日,南韓首爾一名餐廳老闆準備販賣雞肉。 (照片:美聯社)

    When Joe McPherson moved to Seoul in 2002, he thought he was leaving fried chicken behind.

    “Living in the southern US, you think you know fried chicken,” he said. But in Seoul, he said, “there is a mom-and-pop chicken place literally on every corner.” Many Asian cooking traditions include deep-fried chicken, but the popular cult of crunchy, spicy, perfectly nongreasy chicken — the apotheosis of the Korean style — is a recent development.

    Platters of fried chicken are a hugely popular bar food in South Korea — like chicken wings in the US, they are downed with beer or soju, after work or after dinner, rarely eaten as a meal.

    “Some places have a very thin, crisp skin; some places have more garlicky, sticky sauces; some advertise that they are healthy because they fry in 100 percent olive oil,” said McPherson, an English teacher, who writes a food blog called zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal.

    “Suddenly there will be a long line outside one chicken place, for no apparent reason, and then the next week, it’s somewhere else.”

    For crunch, American-style fried chicken relies on a thick, well-seasoned crust, often made even thicker by soaking the chicken pieces beforehand in buttermilk.

    Korean-style fried chicken is radically different, reflecting an Asian frying technique that renders out the fat in the skin, transforming it into a thin, crackly and almost transparent crust. (Chinese cooks call this “paper fried chicken.”) The chicken is unseasoned, barely dipped in very fine flour and then dipped into a thin batter before going into the fryer. It is only seasoned after frying.

    Korean-style fried chicken restaurants are springing up throughout the US.

    (NY Times Services)

    當喬依.麥可佛森二○○二年搬到首爾,他以為再也不會看到炸雞。

    「住在美國南方,你會以為自己知道什麼是炸雞,」但是在首爾,他表示︰「真的每個轉角都是小型炸雞店。」許多亞洲傳統烹調都包括酥炸雞肉,不過脆皮、辣味、完全不油膩的韓式經典雞肉卻是最近才風行一時。

    大盤大盤的炸雞在南韓是廣受歡迎的酒吧食物,就像美國的雞翅,搭配啤酒或燒酒,作為工作後或晚餐後的點心,很少當正餐吃。

    身為英文老師的麥可佛森表示︰「有些店的雞皮非常脆薄,有的店有濃稠的大蒜醬料,有些地方主打健康概念,因為他們使用百分之百的橄欖油進行油炸。」麥可佛森撰寫的美食部落格網址是zenkimchi.com/FoodJournal。

    他表示︰「某家雞肉店外面會沒來由的突然大排長龍,然後隔週就會換別的地方。」

    美式酥脆炸雞靠的是精心調味的厚脆表皮,雞肉通常會被浸泡在白脫牛奶中以增加表皮厚度。

    韓式炸雞則是截然不同,反映出亞洲的油炸技巧—炸出皮中油脂,將皮炸到脆薄幾近透明的程度。(中國廚師稱此為「紙炸雞」),雞肉未經調味,僅沾上很細的麵粉,在下油鍋前浸入稀麵糊,炸完之後才調味。

    韓式炸雞餐廳在全美各地如雨後春筍般開業。

  • Jun

    On a separate note…the NYT reports Red Mango-style frozen yogurt in California.

    Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/21/dining/21pink.html

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