ZenKimchi http://zenkimchi.com Exploring Korean food since 2004 Sun, 03 Dec 2017 13:53:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.1 https://i2.wp.com/zenkimchi.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/cropped-ZK_Logo_app_512.png?fit=32%2C32 ZenKimchi http://zenkimchi.com 32 32 Michelin Guide Seoul: Why You Shouldn’t Rely On It http://zenkimchi.com/commentary/michelin-vs-korean-food/ http://zenkimchi.com/commentary/michelin-vs-korean-food/#respond Sun, 24 Sep 2017 09:05:13 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91830 The post Michelin Guide Seoul: Why You Shouldn’t Rely On It appeared first on ZenKimchi.

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Two articles recently came out on Korea Exposé about Seoul’s Michelin Red Guide.

KÉ Interview: British Food Critic Roasts Michelin Guide on Seoul

 

What the British Food Critic Doesn’t Know

The first interviews British critic Andy Hayler, who claims to have eaten in all the world’s three-star Michelin restaurants, including Seoul’s, and confidently states that they don’t deserve their stars. He then makes some statements about Korean cuisine itself in the world pantheon of food, though he emphatically states that he’s not an expert on Korean food.

The other article attempts to rebut what he said about Korean food, including interviews with two Korean food experts. What they both have in common is that the Seoul Michelin Red Guide sucks dotards.

I’m trying to figure out how to focus my thoughts here. I’ve already written my feelings about the Michelin Guide Seoul in this blog and in Vogue Korea. There are so many arguments shouting in my head. Mostly, it’s this guy.

Where I agree.

He concentrates on the two three-star restaurants in Seoul, Gaon and La Yeon (sometimes Ra Yeon). He flat out states that they don’t deserve three stars. He’s saying this not as an expert on Korean food. He’s saying this as an expert on Michelin three-star restaurants.

The Korean experts in the other article agree. Those restaurants aren’t worth three stars. People on my tours who regularly dine at three-star restaurants were highly disappointed when they dined at the three-star restaurants in Seoul.

The price is what matters. I’ve said many times that when a fine dining restaurant charges high prices in order to give it some false sense of prestige, it should expect to be compared to other global restaurants in that price range. Hayler hasn’t been the only person pointing out how ridiculously high Gaon’s wine list is. Restaurants do put large margins on wine. Korea isn’t Europe. Yet they charge rip-off prices even by Korean standards. Cho Tae-kwon, the owner of Gaon, does the same with his personal brand of soju. It’s a good soju. It’s like Andong soju. He charges way more than you would normally pay for Andong soju. He has a version aged in oak casts that tastes similar to whisky. He slaps on a higher price domestically for this than the import price of single malt Scotch. It’s that old notion that just putting a high price tag on something automatically makes it classy.

Hayler compared the restaurants to Japanese kaiseki cuisine. He said he felt the style didn’t feel like it was coming from a “centuries-old tradition,” like kaiseki. For one thing, kaiseki itself is a modern mash-up of older cuisines. Supposedly the Korean three-stars are taking influence from Korean royal court cuisine. But even what is considered royal court cuisine is suspicious. As one of the Korean experts said, “‘Even kings did not eat a course meal in Korea.'”

I’m tempted to say, again, that Cho Tae-kwon and company don’t respect Korean cuisine enough to let it stand on its own. They have to make it like Japanese and European dining, to the point of pissing on its spirit.

Hayler is not a Korean food expert, but he does have experience eating Korean food in L.A. and New Malden. There’s even a contingent of L.A. Korean-Americans who vocally swear that the Korean food in L.A. is better than the Korean food in Seoul. I agree with him that the flavor of Gaon’s food is not much different than a mom-and-pop restaurant. It’s just given a pretentious makeover. If you take a Choco-Pie and put in on a fancy plate, you have Gaon’s approach. It’s just Kimbap Cheonguk diner fare with pretty plating.

Where I diverge.

I started having a problem when Hayler started wandering the rabbit warren of comparing Korean cuisine with European. They had to have been gotcha questions. I have enough experience with this to say, “No comment.”

But he commented.

Let the cringing start.

I’ll lead with a quote from Hayne Kim, who I find to be an interesting voice when it comes to Korean and western cultures.

I’m no nationalist (grew out of THAT unpleasant phase years ago) but I found his tone problematic and, as he admits, ignorant. I’m not one of those kimchi-philes (must use kimchi to take over the world is one of the stupidest ideas the Korean gov’t has had) but found it weird that he compared it to white truffles. Also the fact that he says Korea has no uber rare and exotic ingredients. Korean ginseng has a huge following from what I understand, as does the Jeju black pig–albeit, the pork is more domestically known.

And a quote from my friend Dan Suh. He is the top Korean food importer in Europe, based in New Malden and currently living in Seoul.

Michelin was lobbied to come to Korea, and there is a particular bias towards one businessman. I had an argument with the Chairman of the Michelin Guide about it, and although I was very open-minded to what he had to say, my opinion still stands. 

 

Korean food is intricate in its own way but lacks the refinement in cooking techniques that French cuisine possesses. There are something like 14 main ingredients to Korean food, which means you can make so many dishes from those ingredients. That, in itself, is a fantastic achievement and shouldn’t be devalued. But at the same time, Korean food needs to advance and realise that it is pigeon-holed and isn’t refined. That’s why I like what some modern chefs are doing (successfully and unsuccessfully), such as at Jungsik, Mingles, Ryunique, Exquisine, by combining classic French techniques with Korean ingredients and flavours.

 

As for Andy Hayler, he’s from the same bunch of critics as Jay Rayner and Fay Maschler, who had a critique removed of a Korean restaurant after she criticised it for not having coriander (cilantro), fish sauce, and chillies in the japchae, and her review was bombarded with hundreds of people laughing at her. So, in truth, British critics are completely ignorant of some of more niche cuisines, such as Korean.

 

I’ve eaten at Ra Yeon, and in truth, it was extremely delicious but the prices do not justify the quality of the food.

 

What this does, really, is throw the integrity of the Michelin Guide into doubt.

I’ve also noticed a good bit of condescension (maybe leftovers of an colonialist POV), from British and European expats regarding Korean food. Heck, try to get any Brit to pronounce Korean words like Pyongyang correctly.

A bad week for Brits and Korean food credibility this week, along with Gordon Ramsay praising Cass in an ad.

It is not unusual for local governments to lobby and help pay for the Michelin Guide to publish a guide on their city. The question is whether they felt pressured to award three stars in their first Seoul Guide, when some cities don’t even have three-star restaurants. According to the other article, Michelin is claiming it had Korean inspectors for their Seoul Guide. Part of me still wonders, with my experience with Korean food critics and bloggers, that they thought more about impressing western elites than honestly evaluating restaurants.

The ingredients claim kicked everyone in the gingko nuts. Started a lot of arguments. Truffles are great. I loves me some truffles. Foie gras. If you want to be nerdy, you can point out that the French got it from the ancient Romans. They are only great if prepared well. Boiling a truffle isn’t going to taste as nice as shaving it into a risotto. I’ve had badly prepared foie as well, where it had the texture of crispy snot.

Unlike even one of the Korean experts interviewed in the article, I believe Korea has some great ingredients that the three-star restaurants ignore.

Ginseng regularly gets slammed into dishes. When eaten straight, it’s like licking dirt. Yet I’ve had an amazing interpretation of Samgyetang that was a consomme heightened by a kiss of ginseng, served with a little twig of ginseng tempura. The dirt flavor gave way to more complexity and had a cooling effect on the palate.

Deodeok is an unsung hero. It’s a root, mostly grown in Gangwon Province that, to me, tastes like a light horseradishey carrot. Why aren’t more restaurants playing with this? My first pop-up, we made a makgeolli cream cheese start and topped it with candied deodeok. It was a revelation.

What about naengi? It’s spicy, pungent, and smells like a crackling fireplace. This is an herb that the world has yet to discover the joys of.

I could list more–Ddeul-ge (wild sesame), perilla leaves, omija, pine mushrooms, Korean pine nuts (which have a higher oil content than Italian pine nuts).

The real strength that distinguishes Korean from most world cuisines…

Fermentation.

Yeah, we all know kimchi (of which there are over 200 varieties and counting). doenjang, gochujang, and soy sauce. These take skill and time to make well. Maybe more skill and definitely more time than Hayler’s comparison to French demi-glace. We also have artisanal fruit and vegetable extracts. Jangajji, fruit and vegetable soy pickles. Why don’t we see more of these in fine dining?

There is one restaurant I know of that features artisanal ingredients like these. Congdu. They have a dish that showcases a flight of different aged soy sauces. I’ve even gotten to try a teaspoon of 100-year soy sauce. They have a bean sauce that was revived from the Goryeo period (918-1392 CE). They source their ingredients from Korean masters, who have been perfecting their crafts for generations. The flavors transport. It feels like, “I thought I knew Korean cuisine. Now I’m into something deeper.”

Last time I was at Congdu, I ran into Hyeonseo Lee, author of The Girl with Seven Names. She said she had been eating there every night for a week because the food was so moving.

I don’t think Congdu has any Michelin stars.

In the end, those two articles pointed out the weakness of the Seoul Michelin Red Guide. Hayler may not be an expert on Korean food, but he is an expert on Michelin restaurants.

There are much better restaurants in Seoul than the Michelin suggests. And Korean ingredients have more unlocked potential than people think.

 

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When I read it aloud, I got it. “Two beer or not two beer.” In Jongno. Thanks Shawn from @seoulhike http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/when-i-read-it-aloud-i-got-it-two-beer-or-not-two-beer-in-jongno-thanks-shawn-from-seoulhike/ http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/when-i-read-it-aloud-i-got-it-two-beer-or-not-two-beer-in-jongno-thanks-shawn-from-seoulhike/#respond Sun, 24 Sep 2017 03:22:40 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91829 View on Instagram http://ift.tt/2xsnN26

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Why I Won’t Open Another Restaurant In Korea http://zenkimchi.com/featured/wont-open-another-restaurant-korea/ http://zenkimchi.com/featured/wont-open-another-restaurant-korea/#comments Tue, 19 Sep 2017 04:21:08 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91815 The copycat culture is getting more and more shameless. I knew of people coming over and taking pictures of the food, trying to take it apart. I remember back when people were doing that at Vatos when they first opened. Last year, after I left the BBQ Pub, a friend invited to me for lunch […]

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The copycat culture is getting more and more shameless.

I knew of people coming over and taking pictures of the food, trying to take it apart. I remember back when people were doing that at Vatos when they first opened.

Last year, after I left the BBQ Pub, a friend invited to me for lunch at VIPS buffet. They had a barbecue section with a white barbecue sauce. Odd, since my old BBQ Pub was the only one in town showcasing North Alabama style white barbecue sauce.

There are now companies that specialize in restaurant espionage. They have teams that will figure out the spices and the techniques and copy them. I mean, why try to do something from your heart when you could just “benchmark” off of someone else’s hard work?

The latest blatant example comes from a place down in Busan called Gourmet Zip. The “Zip” is supposed to mean “집” (Jip, or “house”). It’s annoying enough that some people think Z can easily substitute J, but that’s not the point.

It’s not the point that this is another restaurant relying on Instagram gimmicks.

Credit: 꿈꾸는 애뚜's 블로그

It’s also not the point that this is another bad restaurant culturally appropriating whatever trendy foreign food it can.

  • Ceviche
  • Pasta (for some reason, Caesar Salad is under the Pasta section)
  • Fajitas
  • Steak cooked on a hot stone
  • Detroit Pizza

Detroit Pizza???

For those of you not familiar with Detroit pizza, here is a description from the guys at Motor City Pizza in Seoul.

Detroit-style pizza is a deep-dish pizza developed in Michigan known for its thick crisp crust. The square shaped pizzas are the result of being baked in well-seasoned blue steel pans, which were originally made to hold small parts in automobile factories.

OR…

You can read the Korean description WORD-FOR-WORD on Gourmet Zip’s menu.

Okay, not precisely. They dropped the word “처음으로.” I guess that makes it kosher, right?

Here’s a wider look at the menu. (MexicanTown’s toppings are fairly random.)

Even better, here’s

Motor City’s Original Menu

Motor City Pizza

We see that they copied the name “Detroit Red Top” and added pepperoni and bacon.

Motor City

Gourmet Zip

Then they copied the “Jackson 5” with the addition of pancetta.

But come on, Zen. Pizza toppings aren’t that original.

I agree. But how often does one see RANCH as a sauce on Korean pizza?

I’ve talked to one of the owners of Motor City. He is happy that his beloved Detroit-style pizza is spreading throughout Korea. In fact, other respectable pizza places do Red Top pizzas now.

What is troublesome is that the copycat copied the menu text, the garnish, and they’re getting credit for Motor City’s appearance on the TV food show 수요미식회 Suyo Mishikhwe.

Yes, that’s right.

Motor City was featured on a popular food show, and Gourmet Zip is trying to take credit. Bloggers are stating that it was GOURMET ZIP’S pizza on the TV show!

There’s a narrative logic you can pull from it. Motor City started in June-July 2016. The TV show aired in November 2016. Gourmet Zip opened in March 2017.

I wonder where they got their ingenious menu ideas…

Stop, stop. Don’t rip your hair out.

No, no, no. Please don’t bang your head on the wall.

This is happening all the time, and it’s getting worse. Like I said, there are companies whose bread and butter is to steal recipes and concepts from restaurants.

This is why I’m not opening another restaurant here. At least until there is either some legal protection in place or until this is shamed by the public. It’s hard enough to deal with inefficient corrupt suppliers, local business owners who don’t like foreigners in their territory, cheating partners (I was lucky enough to only have that happen once).

But once you overcome ALL THAT and start becoming successful, there’s some rich bored asshole waiting to steal your whole concept and take credit for it, even if they’re making a shitty version.

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This is a secret find on The Dark Side of Seoul Ghost Walk. Any guess what it could be? http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/this-is-a-secret-find-on-the-dark-side-of-seoul-ghost-walk-any-guess-what-it-could-be/ http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/this-is-a-secret-find-on-the-dark-side-of-seoul-ghost-walk-any-guess-what-it-could-be/#respond Tue, 01 Aug 2017 01:43:42 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91792 View on Instagram http://ift.tt/2wfK1m7

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You, Sparkle Mineral Water, are a bottle of LIES! http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/you-sparkle-mineral-water-are-a-bottle-of-lies/ http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/you-sparkle-mineral-water-are-a-bottle-of-lies/#respond Sat, 29 Jul 2017 05:27:23 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91790 View on Instagram http://ift.tt/2vgiJj5

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Naengmyeon with raw fish http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/naengmyeon-with-raw-fish/ http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/naengmyeon-with-raw-fish/#respond Tue, 25 Jul 2017 04:13:10 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91789 View on Instagram http://ift.tt/2vUQ1R4

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Try the New Improved MegaMaps http://zenkimchi.com/announcements/try-new-improved-megamaps/ http://zenkimchi.com/announcements/try-new-improved-megamaps/#respond Sun, 23 Jul 2017 13:23:25 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91774 The latest version of the ZenKimchi Food & Tours App has been released on both iOS and Android. We’re steadily getting new downloads. I hadn’t promoted the app heavily until I fixed some basic annoyances I had with it. Mainly, THE MEGAMAP. The original workaround was to frame a Google Map inside a shell. I […]

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The latest version of the ZenKimchi Food & Tours App has been released on both iOS and Android.

We’re steadily getting new downloads. I hadn’t promoted the app heavily until I fixed some basic annoyances I had with it. Mainly, THE MEGAMAP.

The original workaround was to frame a Google Map inside a shell. I had already spent weeks building the original MegaMap, and I was trying to find a way to make it work inside the app. The other option was to get users to download it and install it in the Google MyMaps app. The advantage of this was that the map could be updated on the fly. Yet it was slow and clunky. Even worse, it didn’t have a way to show where you were in relation to the restaurants. No “Center Map Here” button. Believe me, I spent every spare moment working on hacks to get this stupid button on the map.

Then I came up with another solution. I could put the map in another system that was native to both Android and iOS. This would give the following advantages.

  • Center the map on the user’s location
  • Show which restaurants were closest to the user
  • Faster operation

The disadvantages were that it removed the search capability, and the restaurants will only update whenever the app itself is updated. It’s all self contained.

BUT HEY!

The MegaMaps work SO MUCH better now.

Because of transferring to a whole new system, I’m having to rebuild the map from scratch. There wasn’t a foolproof way to import the original MegaMap. I’m typing in and uploading pictures for each restaurant one by one. This will take a few weeks. With each update there will be more restaurants. The goal is to make this the most useful app for you when you’re looking for a place to eat in Korea or a place to have a drink. I’ve already found it useful, and I use it frequently myself.

Hang on. More is coming.

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10 Ways to Survive a Korean Summer http://zenkimchi.com/announcements/10-ways-to-survive-a-korean-summer/ http://zenkimchi.com/announcements/10-ways-to-survive-a-korean-summer/#comments Tue, 11 Jul 2017 01:01:25 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=4375 These are the foods we cling to that makes the blistering Korean summer bearable. Let's pop open the ice chest and share the goodies.

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I think the ice has melted now. Pretty safe to say that. But who knows with that hellish winter that stuck around too long like me at a wine party. Hopefully the list we did on winter survival foods helped a bit. Now it’s time to cope with the heat and the rain.

Eun Jeong and I pow-wowed on this list. As with the winter list, she had reservations on a few items that Koreans don’t consider traditional foods for this time of year. But for a lot of us, these are the foods we cling to that makes the blistering Korean summer bearable. Let’s pop open the ice chest and share the goodies.

10. MulHwe 물회

MulHui - chilled sashimi soup

This chilled sashimi soup and its “bibim” cousin Makhwe 막회 come all slushed out in crushed ice in a refreshing just-spicy-enough broth. Put the frosty stainless steel bowl to your mouth, and it’s like drinking from Arctic waters–if they were filled with gochujang and thinly sliced fish.

9. Patbingsu 팥빙수

Eun Jeong eating Patbingsu

I think of Patbingsu as a frozen dessert bibimbap. Shaved ice gets loaded with sweetened red beans, various fruits, candies, pillowy marshmallow-like ddeok plus whatever other additions can be fit in there, like sweetened condensed milk and ice cream. I like mine with a lot of fruit. Just stir it like bibimbap and devour. Watch for patbingsu headaches!

8. Bindaeddeok and Dong Dong Ju 빈대떡과 동동주

Mung bean pancakes and makkoli rice beer

These are for a lazy afternoon when the sun is baking or when the rain is beating down on the steamy ground. A crispy, toasty, almost corn scented, Bindaeddeok (mung bean pancake) with the house made rice brew Dong Dong Ju satisfies the inner ajosshi. Enjoy this in the open air or under a shelter isolated by the sea of rain.

7. Samgyetang 삼계탕

Samgyetang - Ginseng Whole Chicken Soup

This is the obligatory Samgyetang ranking, considering it’s the top traditional cure for summer’s electrolyte depletion. Assuming it was bland compared to other Korean foods, I stayed away from it for years. But one hot day, Eun Jeong was greatly craving it. For me, the chicken isn’t the star. It’s the ginseng and the goodies inside the chicken. That combined with the Insam-ju–soju inflused with ginseng–and the tastes bring me to a cool moss-blanketed forest floor. If you can handle picking through the bones of an entire chicken, this isn’t a bad dish for late summer.

6. Hwe DeopBap 회덮밥

Hui DeopBap - Sashimi Bibimbap

From avlxyz on Flickr

I understand the old guideline that raw fish is meant for the winter. That was good advice before the days of reliable refrigeration. Even though Hwe DeopBap has the name “DeopBap,” it’s treated more like a Bibimbap than just raw fish on rice. It’s rice, lettuce, veggies and some type of raw fish that you mix with vinegared gochujang (Chojang 초장). It’s cooling and would make a great lunch during a day at the beach–or a great lunch that would make you think you’re having a day at the beach. I particularly like mine with some crunchy fish roe sprinkled in there.

5. Strange Korean Ice Creams

Corn ice cream

Summer brings on new waves of discounted Korean ice creams. We’ve seen the tomato popsicle, the controversial corn ice cream (love it), sweet potato ice cream and the suggestively titled “Big Screw.” There’s that clever watermelon ice cream popsicle with chocolate-covered sesame seeds. The milkshake in a pouch. The popsicle with gum inside the popsicle stick. Sports ice. Pistachio ice cream cones. Fish-shaped BungeoBbang ice cream. Pineapple bars. Melon bars. Red bean popsicles. The Dwaeji Bar.

Summer makes me fat.

4. Oi NaengGuk 오이냉국/Oi Muchim 오이무침

Korean cucumber salad

These are almost in the same category. I love the tiny bowl of tangy chilled cucumber soup that comes as banchan with many summer meals. I also look forward to Eun Jeong’s Oi Muchim, which is by far the most popular recipe on ZenKimchi. Thinly sliced cucumbers dressed with onions in a sweet and spicy vinegar dressing. The taste of summer!

Also, Maangchi shows how to make Oi Naengguk.

3. Korean BBQ

Korean BBQ

Those cucumber dishes are best accompanied by a charcoal barbecue. Not traditionally considered a summer food in Korea, I’m pretty sure the rest of the world considers grilling meat a summer treat. I can’t wait for those steamy heavy nights sitting outside, watching the people go by, grilling galbi and samgyeopsal with some icy draft beers.

2. Fried Chicken and Beer

Two-Two Fried Chicken

Speaking of beer, summer is the ideal time for the Korean chicken hof–bars that specialize in Korean fried chicken and beer. It’s a classic combo, right Ludacris?

Ludacris - Chicken and Beer

I keep going back to my first year in Korea and hanging out at Two-Two Chicken with the Ansan gang. Something about the summer heat even makes the mayo and ketchup drizzled cabbage taste good.

1. Naengmyeon 냉면

Naengmyeon - Chilled Buckwheat Noodles

This is the reason to look forward to summer. I’ve already had my first Naengmyeon fit, and the quenching bowl of noodles doused the heat-induced cravings. And don’t forget the Gangwon Province version called Makguksu. There’s even a makguksu museum out there. This restaurant we went to last weekend also served simple buckwheat jeon that were pleasantly smooth and mild with a touch of the earthiness that makes Naengmyeon noodles so great. *

There are many more summer foods that didn’t make the list but should get an honorable mention, like Mul Kimchi, Makguksu, fresh blended fruit juice and barley tea. What are some others?

* I should note that even though buckwheat is not a grain that comes from grass (like wheat) and doesn’t itself have gliadin proteins that aggravate the gluten-sensitive, most Korean Naengmyeon, Makguksu and Japanese Soba are mixed with some wheat flour so that the noodles can form a strong enough dough, like around 10 percent. So if you’re highly gluten-sensitive, it’s best to avoid them.

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My favorite snack lately. Korean Smoked Eggs. http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/my-favorite-snack-lately-korean-smoked-eggs/ http://zenkimchi.com/instagram/my-favorite-snack-lately-korean-smoked-eggs/#respond Tue, 27 Jun 2017 04:22:40 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91732 View on Instagram http://ift.tt/2tgGvdF

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Where To Eat in Korea? Download Our New App. http://zenkimchi.com/featured/eat-korea-download-new-app/ http://zenkimchi.com/featured/eat-korea-download-new-app/#respond Tue, 30 May 2017 03:33:02 +0000 http://zenkimchi.com/?p=91714 The post Where To Eat in Korea? Download Our New App. appeared first on ZenKimchi.

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Is there a reliable map of restaurants in Seoul?

What bars have specials tonight?

I’m visiting Seoul. What should I do there? Are there any good tours?

How can I meet fellow Korean foodies in Korea?

I’ve been working hard for the past few months on this, and now it’s finally come out. The ZenKimchi Food & Tours App is now available in the Google Play Store.

 

The app includes the following features:

  • Restaurant MegaMap with spots curated from ZenKimchi, Restaurant Buzz Seoul, and even books like Graham Holliday’s new must-read tome Eating Korea: Reports on a Culinary Renaissance. It also includes popular markets and food neighborhoods.
  • Food Events Calendar. A convenient easy-to-use source for wing nights, trivia nights, ladies’ nights. bar specials, pop-up events, makgeolli making classes. You no longer have an excuse to stay home for the evening.
  • Easily bookable tours. The famous Dark Side of Seoul Ghost Walk and other tours are now easily bookable from within the app.
  • Social Feature. Find and chat with other foodies in Korea. It’s like KakaoTalk for Korean foodies (aka “Grumblees”). You can also turn off this feature for privacy.

More features will be on the way. Get in early and check it out.

UPDATE: iOS version is now available for iPhone and iPad.

Restaurant & Bar Owners

Add your weekly specials, events, and special menus to the app by filling out this form.

ADD EVENT

The post Where To Eat in Korea? Download Our New App. appeared first on ZenKimchi.

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